Success and the Crafty Freemason

Success and the Crafty Freemason

The Crafty Freemason in Durham, a city in northeast England, gets orders from around the world and is thriving as a real shop in a market that now is dominated by online sellers.

“What makes my business stand out from other regalia businesses is that it is local,” said owner and Freemason Susan Blackett. “People can call in and view products before purchase. I can make things bespoke.”

It’s that personal touch that Blackett says makers her business, which had an open day in March, a standout. Located at 41 Quebec Street, Langley Park, in Durham, The Crafty Freemason offers handmade Masonic products, regalia, accessories and hand-crafted items.

Blackett said the business began when she became a Freemason. She was initiated in October of 2013 in Lodge City of Durham No. 105, which labors under the Order of Women Freemasons. “I was passed and raised by April 2014 and this has been very much instrumental in forming my business idea,” Blackett said.

More recently, Blackett has received the Mark, Royal Ark Mariner and ‘Chapter’ Royal Arch, the latter on Feb. 22.

Already a skilled embroiderer and fabric artist, it was natural that the symbols of Freemasonry began to appear in her art, particularly after she became a Master Mason. In April of 2015, she made a cushion bearing the square and compasses for herself and posted photos to a Masonic group active on Facebook. The response was overwhelming, she said.

“I received a multitude of orders and lots of encouragement to develop this into a business,” Blackett recalled. “I attended a small business course and then set myself up as a sole trader making an array of Masonic related hand crafted items.” The Crafty Freemason opened for business that following August.

That was the birth of The Crafty Freemason, which started life in a small room of Blackett’s home. It was not an easy market to break into and regalia sellers aren’t generally succeeding in brick and mortar shops anymore. Toye & Co. had closed its own shop on London’s Great Queen Street, across from Freemasons Hall, in January of that year.

It was her peculiar skill set in art, ease with her clientele and ferreting out merchandise that has helped her succeed in a difficult market, Blackett said. “As my business progressed rapidly, I listened to my customers and it is they who re-defined the structure and purpose of the business through the requests they made, i.e. for ties, gloves, regalia and all manner of Masonic necessities,” she said. “I sourced items, found suppliers who would offer me quality items to retail and my work space advanced to a larger room in my house.”

When her entire house was taken up in the venture, word of The Craft Freemason spread outside the northeast of England and large orders starting coming in from Israel and Kenya, Blackett said she “realized I had to professionalize my business.”

“I likened it to a plant in a pot,” she said. “It can only grow so far in a certain sized pot if you want it to become bigger you have to plant it in a larger pot.”

The larger pot turned out to be the shop in Durham but there may yet be a need for an even larger pot. “I am gradually building up my products in variety and number to cover all Masonic orders although I’m not quite there yet,” Blackett said.

Photo: Susan Blackett with one of her displays at her shop, The Crafty Freemason, in Durham a city in northeast England.

August in Athens: Summer International Masonic Workshop in Greece

August in Athens: Summer International Masonic Workshop in Greece

If the traveling Craftsman with an eye toward making an advancement in Masonic Knowledge was spoiled for choice with multiple conferences this past spring, another is coming in August.

The third Summer International Masonic Workshop, scheduled from the 23rd to the 27th of August in Athens, is being billed as “a unique opportunity for Freemasons around the world, as well as for anyone interested in Freemasonry, and their families to meet, get acquainted and discuss options and opinions on Freemasonry, while they enjoy a summer break next to an idyllic beach.”

The stated aim of the workshop is “to provide an overview of the most recent topics concerning the Masonic Fraternity, such as the role of Freemasonry in the 21st century, regularity, recognition and fraternal relations, Masonic research etc.”

Organizers are trying to make it very clear that the workshop is not affiliated to any masonic or academic body, is not in any way a tyled event and that there won’t be any associated tyled meetings. Those points are very important to some Freemasons.

The workshop in Greece follows similar conferences in May. There was the International Meeting of European Masonic Lodges in Toulon, the World Conference on Fraternalism, Freemasonry, and History at the Bibliotheque Nationale de France in Paris and the United Grand Lodge of England’s Tercentenary gathering in Montego Bay, Jamaica. The four gatherings are making 2017 one of the most conference-dense in Masonic academic study.

The call for papers at the Greek conference ended May 31 and six guest speakers have been announced.


Susan Mitchell Sommers (Featured Image): Saint Vincent College Professor and General Editor of the Journal for Research into Freemasonry and Fraternalism who, with Andrew Prescott, recently released the so-called “paper heard round the world.” That paper challenges the 1717 Freemason genesis date, maintaining the actual date probably is about four years later. Her paper’s topic is “James Anderson and the Myth of 1717.”


David Harrison

David Harrison

David Harrison: Masonic historian and archaeologist based in the UK and the author ofeight books on the history of Freemasonry, his work has appeared in a variety and magazines. These include Philalethes Magazine, Freemasonry Today, MQ Magazine, The Square, Knight Templar Magazine, Heredom, and New Dawn Magazine. Harrison has also appeared in television and radio spots talking about Freemasonry. His paper’s topic will be “Byron, Freemasonry and the Carbonari.”

 


Remzi Sanver

Remzi Sanver

Remzi Sanver: A Freemason born in Istanbul, he is senior researcher at the French National Scientific Research Center (CNRS) whose best known research is about “Game Theory” and “Collective Decision Making Theory.” He also has been on the editorial board of various international scientific journals and the administrative board of scientific societies. His paper’s topic will be “Sufism at the Crossroad of Two Traditions: Thoughts on Initiation and Islam.”

 


Robert Bashford

Robert Bashford

Robert Bashford: Masonic Researcher and well-known in Masonic conferences since he presented his first paper in 1984, his work on behalf of Irish Lodge of Research No 200 I.C. was acknowledged in 2009 with the presentation of the Lodge of Research Jewel of Merit. His more recent appearances were at the International Meeting of European Masonic Lodges in May, Lodge Hope of Kurrachee and the Manchester Association of Masonic Research. His paper’s topic will be “The origins of the Grand Council of Knight Masons in the year 2553 of Knight Masonry.”

Philippa Faulks

Philippa Faulks


Philippa Faulks: Author, ghostwriter, editor and journalist, her first book, “Masonic Magician: the Life and Death of Count Cagliostro and his Egyptian Rite“, co-authored with Robert L. D. Cooper, included the first full English translation of, and commentary on, Cagliostro’s Egyptian Rite of Freemasonry. Her paper’s topic will be “Count Cagliostro’s Egyptian Right of Freemasonry product of a miracle worker or man of straw?”

 


Valdis Pirags

Valdis Pirags

Valdis Pirags: Freemason, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Latvia and the Head of the Clinic of Internal Medicine at the Pauls Stradiņš Clinical University Hospital in Riga. He is a recipient of the Karl Oberdisse Award and the Distinguished Research Award from the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences. More recently, he has been working on epidemiology of diabetes mellitus in Latvia and creation of the Genome Database of the Latvian Population. His paper’s topic will be “Freemasonry as a Method of Attaining Enlightenment.”


Registration is required. Cost for the event ranges between 500 and 1,000 Euros, depending on the package selected. The costs includes accommodation in a four-star hotel on the Athenian coast.

The Bond of Friendship: Brother Nellie McCool and Brother Ursula Monroe

The Bond of Friendship: Brother Nellie McCool and Brother Ursula Monroe

Friendships often are forged in Masonry but very few are as strong and long-lasting as that of Ursula Monroe and Nellie McCool, both Brothers of the 33rd Degree and members of the Supreme  Council of the Honorable Order of Universal Co-Masonry. “We met in a book store in Colorado Springs,” Monroe recalled during a recent joint interview. 

Their friendship now is in its fifth decade. The two, pictured above with McCool on the left and with Bro. Olimpia Sandoval in the center, have remained close since they regularly attend Lodge and various Masonic functions together. They also live across the hall from each other in separate apartments in the same building in Castle Rock, Colorado, very near the Order’s headquarters in Larkspur.

Ursula as a Berlin Philosophy professor before WWII

Ursula Monroe in 1943


“Friendships in Freemasonry are some of the strongest you will find,” McCool said.

Monroe was born on June 28th, 1919 in Berlin, Germany. She earned her degree in Philosophy and became a college professor. Unfortunately, she, as did many, suffered greatly during World War II.

McCool was born January 25th, 1922 in Lahunta, Oklahoma, and she grew up in Beaver, Oklahoma and Colorado Springs, Colorado with her older brother, Harry McCool.

Nellie's 1945 college yearbook photo

Nellie McCool’s 1945 college yearbook photo.

Shortly after graduating from high school, with the United State’s entry into World War II after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, both McCool siblings became aviators.

Lt. Harry McCool was part of Doolittle’s famous raid over Tokyo and later flew missions over Europe. 

Nellie McCool received her aviation training at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas, where she was among the Class 44-7-Trainees and became a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs), achieving the rank of Captain in the U.S. Air Force Reserves. 

“Our motto was ‘We live in the wind and sand…and our eyes are on the stars,” McCool recalled.

Nellie as a WASP

Nellie McCool as a WASP

Ursula’s life took a turn shortly after the war was over. “I married a G.I.,” she recalled. Her marriage to Clifford Monroe brought her to the U.S. and also gave her that first brush with Freemasonry. “My husband was a Freemason,” she said. “I supported him in that. I didn’t know much about it then. I thought it was only for men.”

Through the years, Monroe also indulged a love for travel and experiences. In 1969, she was adopted by the Sioux Red Cloud Clan tribe at Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota in honor of her translation into German a book about one of their Chiefs: Chief Eagle. She was given the name  “Pte Sanaki Napewin,” which translates into English as “She who brings out white buffalo cow.”

“I used to love to travel,” she said with a laugh. “Now I’m too lazy.” She earned her Ph.D. in English and was a professor in the department of Humanities at Colorado College until she retired.

McCool’s life also changed after World War II ended. The WASPs were disbanded, and McCool soon found herself back in school. She attended Colorado College, majoring in Psychology. She later earned her Ph.D. in the field. She became a teacher at several Colorado-area schools, including North Junior High, South Security School, and Harrison Senior High School. Later, she was supervisor of Vocational Guidance for the State Board of Community Colleges and Occupational Education.

Ursula during one of her many travels and experiences

Ursula Monroe on one of her many travels

Monroe’s life took yet another turn in 1972 when her husband died. A few years after that, she met an associate of Manly P. Hall. That associate introduced her to Co-Freemasonry, though it was not her first understanding of the Craft. 

“I was always interested,” Monroe said. “I had to make that first contact. You have to be around Freemasons and know Freemasons before you can become a Freemason.”

She did just that in 1979, Initiated on April 14th of that year in Lodge Amor-Sapientia in Pasadena, California. She was Passed the following 12th of August and then Raised on the 3rd of August 1980. She became Master of Kiva Lodge in Colorado Springs. On November 16th, 1998, she became a member of the Supreme Council and serves with on that body today.

It was a few years after Monroe was made a Mason that she had that fateful meeting with McCool in a Colorado Springs-area book store. “It turned out we were living in the same area,” Monroe said.

The friendship blossomed from there. It wasn’t long after that Monroe introduced McCool to Co-Freemasonry. McCool was intrigued enough to go have a look at the Order’s headquarters in Larkspur, about an hour from her home then in Colorado Springs. “I drove there and had a look at the building,” she said. “It just felt right.”

She certainly was interested, McCool said. “I was very excited,” she said. “I was happy to have found a Masonry that accepted women as well as men.”

McCool was initiated soon after, and ever since, they have been Masonically together. If Monroe goes to a meeting, McCool does, too. If McCool does something related to Masonry, Monroe will be there, too. Brothers in the Order see the two as inseparable, where one turns up the other will soon follow.

Both took part in the funeral of then Grand Commander Helen Wycherly in May of 1993 at the Headquarters Temple in Larkspur. Monroe was Orator that day while McCool was Junior Deacon. Today, both serve on the Orders’ Supreme Council. McCool also became a member of the Order’s Grand Council of Administration when she succeeded John Tzaras, who passed to the Grand Lodge Eternal on October 23, 2009.

“It’s a way of life,” McCool said. “I can no longer imagine not being a Mason.”


 

 

Separate But Equal? The Masonic Society’s 2017 Conference

Separate But Equal? The Masonic Society’s 2017 Conference

Wow, I start blogging and folks chime in for coverage of their favorite Masonic event, which is quite a compliment. Thank you.

Those who’ve asked whether I’ll cover or attend a certain U.S.-based research society’s conference in September have been quite taken aback by my uncharacteristically icy response.

I don’t do icy often or especially well. On this occasion, it’s deserved. I have never, ever – for almost a decade – appreciated the need to push a “separate but equal” idea behind full membership requirements of that society. I find it especially and unnecessarily ugly because it’s done by a society that supposedly has a high regard for Masonic scholarship.

No, I will not be attending The Masonic Society’s conference September 7-10 in Lexington, Kentucky.

Yes, I am aware the conference is in the U.S. and it plans to feature “nationally renowned Masonic speakers, panel discussions on Freemasonry, formal festive board, and tours of the Kentucky Horse Park and Henry Clay’s Ashland estate.” Yes, presentation topics are expected to include “American Freemasons: Three Centuries of Building Communities,” “Admit Him if Properly Clothed: Three Centuries of American Masonic Regalia,” and “Data Driven Masonry.” Yes, there’s even a plan for a drawing for a Kentucky long rifle.

I’ve heard from one Co-Mason who lives in that region and received an email invite from the society to attend the conference. That raised a brow for me. Really? That’s a thing?

That prompted me to revisit the membership page of The Masonic Society, and I see that full membership requirements have not changed.

To be a full member of the Masonic Society, you must be a Master Mason and member of a lodge in good standing chartered by “a recognized Grand Lodge.” By recognized, The Masonic Society is referring mostly to male-only orders, so that your lodge is “recognized” just fine might not apply here. This means that your Grand Lodge must be either a member of the Conference of Grand Masters of Masons in North America (CGMMNA) or recognized by at least three CGMMNA member grand lodges.

That’s not the part that bothers me. If the society wants to have its own little club and restrict membership, I have no issues with that point. Freemasonry itself, after all, is exclusive.

What troubles me is this bit: “All others, including but not limited to Libraries, Masonic Lodges, Lodges of Research, other institutions, and those individuals who do not otherwise qualify for full membership may purchase a subscription to the Journal.”

So, my money is good enough for The Masonic Society, but I’m not. Well, huh.

Why bring it up? I can subscribe to any number of publications in the world put out by male-only bodies that don’t consider me “regular” but see no need to point it out when I subscribe. The Masonic Society supposedly is a research body that is independent, not beholden to any grand lodge or Masonic supreme body, so specifically telling me a subscription is all I may have is a bit glaring. It speaks volumes that the society feels the need to pointedly state that.

It’s my understanding that fees collected by The Masonic Society, including subscriptions, pay for printing its regularly published magazine and to fund its annual meetings, such as September’s conference. I hear the society produces a lot of fine research.

Its beginnings were difficult. The Masonic Society’s birth in March of 2008 was accompanied by far more heat than light. It was born out of a “failed coup” by disaffected Brothers of the Philalethes Society, which regularly publishes its “Journal of Masonic Research & Letters” and celebrated its own Assembly and Feast in Bloomington, Minnesota earlier this month. The Philalethes Society was shaken for quite a while but, to my observation, has since managed to steady itself.

I was around for a lot of the discussion at the time, and it was not pleasant. Amid all that heat, the newly incorporated society’s, membership requirements came up hardly at all. In fact, to my knowledge, I was the only one who mentioned it.

I belong to other research bodies and I’m kept plenty busy. I’m also friends with a number of Brothers in The Masonic Society. I’m not doubting they do good work, at least within their narrow sphere. I just don’t go there. As a Co-Mason, I don’t go where I’m not wanted or respected.

That’s me, my personal take and what I think about it. I’m not at all suggesting that no one attend the conference or that anyone else be offended as I am.

I am suggesting that any Co-Mason or any other “unrecognized” Brother who attends this conference or has anything to do with the society be aware that she or he may be considered or treated as second-class.

I do not intend to ever again blog about The Masonic Society so long as this bit remains as it is. I’m thinking they won’t miss me. And since there is no such thing as bad press, this coverage of the conference should be plenty.

Peace.

 

ICOM 2017: A Call for Globalization of Masonic Research

ICOM 2017: A Call for Globalization of Masonic Research

If any single message could be said to have come out of last spring’s first International Meeting of Masonic Research Lodges in Toulon, France, it’s that Masonic scholars of all nations need to talk to each other.

England and France are examples of two countries where Masonic scholars do excellent work, British researcher John Belton said during his comments at the three-day conference’s close in the main auditorium at Neptune Palace. “But they don’t speak to each other,” Belton said.

John Belton photo taken by Olafur Magnusson

British researcher John Belton, left, during his final presentation at the ICOM

 

And yet the water of Masonic research is all the same water “and there are other rivers besides the Loire and the Thames,” he continued. Belton, whose latest book, “Dudley Wright: Writer, Truthseeker & Freemason” was released last summer, was among a number of contributors at the conference who urged more international cooperation among Masonic Scholars. Such networks have been attempted before but only a few have succeeded.

Those few successes offer models for inclusion of scholarship from multiple continents. Neil Wynes Morse, one of the world’s leading experts in Masonic ritual development and President of the Australia and New Zealand Masonic Research Council, described in his own comments the council’s program that every two years hosts a scholar for a tour of that continent.

Neil-during-his-presentation

Australia and New Zealand Masonic Research Council President Neil Wynes Morse, left, during his final presentation at the ICOM and Louis Trebuchet, one of the ICOM’s primary organizers, looks on.

 

Such a model has been tried over the years elsewhere in the world without much success but the ANZMRC program proves it can work. “You’re halfway there,” Morse quipped. “Thank you for considering the antipodean model.”

The International Meeting of Masonic Research Lodges, ICOM 2017, was the first gathering that now is expected to happen every two years. A mini-conference, one day only, was announced for next spring in Washington D.C., and I’ll blog more about that as more information becomes available. This year’s conference attracted about 2,300 participants and visitors for an extensive program of three plenary lectures and 19 round-table discussions. 

The two dozen internationally known scholars who attended included Belton, Morse, Louis Trebuchet, Pierre Mollier, Margaret Jacob, Oscar Alleyne, Mike Kearsley, Jan Snoek, and Robert Bashford.

Jan Snoek, left, with John Belton during an ICOM presentation photo by Olafur Magnusson

Dutch researcher Jan Snoek, left, during one of his presentations.

Between the conference rooms were exhibitions of about 150 Masonic artifacts owned by the Grande Loge de France and from private collections, that illustrated the roots of the Craft in France. These include tracing boards, symbols, regalia, mallets, banners, maps and original documents.

 

“It was a happy meeting – and maybe better because it was outside Paris,” Belton told conference organizers in what may – or may not – have been a subtle nudge at the World Conference on Fraternalism, Freemasonry, and History at the Bibliotheque Nationale de France the following weekend. “I think the speakers were able to engage with the audience frere a frere in a way that cannot happen when a meeting is academic.”

Belton said he was especially impressed by the exemplification of an 18th Century French Initiation ceremony, complete with period costumes, presented the last day of the conference. Brothers from Saint Jean d’Ecosse Lodge No. 1, the Scottish Mother Lodge of Marseilles that labors under the Grand Lodge of France, presented the ritual accompanied by two violinists and a harpsichordist. “The reconstruction ceremony was awesome because there were brothers and sisters from many continents and many obediences and we were all able to share the same experience,” Belton said.

For those who couldn’t attend the conference and those who could but would like to relive it, an audio download now is available. Please see the conference website for more details.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Photo Credit: Olafur Magnusson

Who Owns Freemasonry?

Who Owns Freemasonry?

A peculiar and apparently ongoing protest at an online Masonic “University,” of which a sort-of Craft-based activist group reportedly has taken over and is making demands, has raised an unexpected question: Who Owns Freemasonry?

The question came up in The Past Bastard and it’s report this week about a self-described group calling itself the SRJWs or “Scottish Rite Justice Warriors” who have somehow taken over the online “Freemason University.” The SRJWs have issued a list of oddly amusing demands that must be met before “Freemason University” – which, to my knowledge, did nothing to the SRJWs – will be allowed to continue on its way.

If you’ve never heard of Freemason University, go have a look here. It’s an online resource affiliated with the Grand Lodge of Ohio to provide “essential tools for the leaders of our craft.” Modules include leadership and management, ritual and an interesting section called “Further Light.” Much of the material is available free online, free being a very good thing for that daily progress in Masonry.

The fact that I can access the online university suggests the SRJWs need a better hacker.

“They asked us to stop serving green beans and potatoes with baked chicken, and to add some classes on such odd things as the history of the ritual,” University Chairman Doug Darjeeling (who doesn’t Google at all) was quoted by The Past Bastard. “I mean, who thinks of crazy things like that? It’s like they are asking us to teach that the UGLE doesn’t own Freemasonry.”

I can almost hear the crickets.

The Past Bastard reported that it, quite sensibly, pointed out to Darjeeling that the United Grand Lodge of England does not own Freemasonry. Darjeeling reportedly ended the interview, saying that The Past Bastard “needed to educate ourselves before we could even think about reporting on such a story.”

Uh-huh.

If you can’t tell by now, I’m not buying this story. After all, The Past Bastard – “Your Best Source for Masonic News Satire” – is like that.

However, I suppose I can understand Bro. Darjeeling’s confusion – real or otherwise – about the UGLE and it’s supposed ownership of Freemasonry. I’ve encountered quite a few wildly uninformed Brothers who think the UGLE was the first lodge of Freemasons (Edinburgh Lodge No. 1 and Mother Kilwinning respectfully object) and then act on that belief by thinking first implies ownership (proved no barrier to Christopher Columbus).

However, even if we dispense with that, it naturally follows that the true owner of Freemasonry should be named.

To get at that, Masonic scholars have for generations referred to the John F. Tolle decision, an appeal decided by the U.S. Patent Office in 1872 on those occasions when the ownership of Freemasonry has come up. Tolle was a businessman who wanted to use the square and compasses on flour in barrels.

To be clear, both the square and the compasses predate Freemasonry and are tools not exclusive to operative masonry. Thus, Tolle did not see a problem with using the tools to sell his flour. The U.S. Patent Office opined otherwise:

“If this emblem were something other than precisely what it is, either less known, less significant, or fully and universally understood, all this might readily be admitted. But, considering its peculiar character and relation to the public, an anomalous question is presented. There can be no doubt that this device, so commonly worn and employed by Masons, has an established mystic significance, universally recognized as existing; whether comprehended by all or not is not material to this issue. In view of the magnitude and extent of the Masonic organization, it is impossible to divest its symbols, or at least this particular symbol, perhaps the best known of all, of its ordinary significance wherever displayed. It will be universally understood, or misunderstood, as having Masonic significance, and therefore as a trademark must certainly work deception.”

While it does not speak to ownership of Freemasonry, the opinion does speak to who can – so far as the U.S. Patent Office is concerned – use the square and compasses as an emblem that cannot be trademarked for other purposes. Only Freemasons are entitled to it, according to the opinion.

You have to follow it a bit further to recognize who owns Freemasonry. In my opinion, the owners of Freemasonry are Freemasons, each and every one – and none of them. Freemasons, often absentee owners at best, cannot agree to what purpose we all work, but we are really darn sure we are doing it. No one really is at the wheel and all of that may, perhaps, point up the W*, S* & B* of Freemasonry. She is everywhere and nowhere, everyone’s and no one’s.

Good luck putting the chains on.

Rare Manuscript in Jeopardy: The Future of The York Manuscript No. 4

Rare Manuscript in Jeopardy: The Future of The York Manuscript No. 4

A painfully rare and important treasure of Freemasonry is in trouble.

The York Manuscript (MS) No. 4, long in the care of York Lodge 236, itself well within sight of the York Minister, is deteriorating.

There are breaks and cracks along the edges of this precious document, and it can no longer bear close inspection. Very good copies of York MS No. 4 exist, but the original itself is in real danger of passing away. The Brothers of York Lodge 236 are actively looking for advice about how best to conserve the roll.

York MS No. 4 is important to Freemasonry because it is a rare document that describes the ritual and history of operative masonry, to which Freemasonry can claim at least some connection. The roll, however, is also of great importance for the history of women in Freemasonry because this document contains a very critical word that has for generations caused discomfort for a large number of male-only Freemasons.

That word is “shee.”

The manuscript itself, a copy taken from a far older document, dates to 1693 and tells the story of how Edwin, King of Northumbria, was made a Mason at York. While doing that, the document also described how it was done in that assembly.

A crucial portion of those instructions reads (with my italics; please see copy above):

“The one of the elders takeing the Booke and that hee or shee that is to be made mason shall lay their hands thereon, and the charge shall be given.”

The journey to see this document with my own eyes began in March of 2008 when I viewed a very good copy at the Provincial Grand Lodge of East Lancashire in Manchester.

That copy, an image of which is reproduced here, was so good that I mistook it for the original and so described it in my first book

I was alerted to my error earlier this year and soon had an invitation to come to York and see the York MS No. 4 for myself.

Senior Warden Joe Postill, along with Junior Warden and Acting Librarian Graham Kaye, BEM, were my hosts that beautiful spring day in May. York Lodge 236 has been in possession of the roll since it was donated to the Lodge in 1736 by Francis Drake, York’s first historian and author of his own “History and Antiquities of Yorkshire.”

York Roll unrolled a little

York Roll No. 4 is not the only treasure preserved by York Lodge 236. The Lodge also holds portions of York Rolls No. 1 and No. 2, which together provide the earliest references to nonoperative masons in the guild at York. The Lodge also preserves splendid old tracing boards, other artifacts, and even has beautiful editions – with hand illuminated frontispieces – of Robert Gould’s “History of Freemasonry”.

Of course, I was there to see York Roll No. 4, and my hosts did remove it for me from its container and unrolled it a little ways. However, it soon was clear the roll simply cannot bear too much handling, and it was safely returned to its container. I didn’t get to see that critical sentence, detailed above, for myself but I’ve no doubt it’s there. Perhaps, one day, after it is somehow conserved, I will have a chance to do so.

York MS No. 4’s importance to the history of women in operative and speculative masonry in particular, and modern Freemasonry in general, cannot be overestimated.

This crucial roll, along with other very rare old documents, points up a fact that some male-only Masons would prefer be otherwise: that there was no bar to women’s membership in the old operative guilds.

In fact, the exclusion of women was an innovation introduced by male-only Masons eager that there be no women not only in male-only lodges but also none in their own female-only lodges or in mixed lodges elsewhere. While there is no period in modern Freemasonry in which there is not at least one woman Freemason documented somewhere in the world, the Craft was well into its second century before the lodge doors became more generally open to women. It remains a difficult struggle in many parts of the world even to the present day.

For this reason, York MS No. 4’s deteriorating condition amounts to an emergency that needs to be addressed by those who know how. I most certainly hope that happens.

Co-Masonic Order Resumes “Universal” as Part of its Official International Name

Co-Masonic Order Resumes “Universal” as Part of its Official International Name

The Order for decades called “The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry” now is “The Honorable Order of Universal Co-Masonry.” The decision follows a vote by the Order’s Grand Consistory and Lodges, with 95 percent of the Lodges and 100 percent of the Consistory approving the proposition. The vote was ratified by a unanimous vote of the Supreme Council on April 25th, 2017. 

“Universal has a geographical implication of being all over the globe, but also that we allow membership of all races, creeds, religions, sexual orientations, etc.,” Matias Cumsille, President of the Order’s Corporate wing, the American Federation of Human Rights, said in an email.

The corporate name remains the same.

The word “Universal” was part of the Order’s original name during its beginnings in North America, where the first Co-Masonic Lodge on the continent was founded in 1903. The word “Universal” first appears in Co-Masonic history with the founding of “The Order of Universal Co-Freemasonry in Great Britian and the British Dependencies” by Annie Besant in 1902.

That Order operated under the umbrella the French-based “Maçonnerie Mixte”, today know as The International Order of Freemasonry for Men and Women, Le Droit Humain. The North American Order then was Le Droit Humain’s American Federation.

“Universal” likewise became part of the North American Federation’s name and seems to have intermittently continued into the 1940s. An investigation into why the word “Universal” ultimately was replaced turned up no certain answers. North American Co-Masonry remained part of Le Droit Humain until a separation during a protracted and often contentious legal proceeding in the 1990s.

The Order in North America has since operated as an independent Masonic body, “The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry,” operating out of its long-time headquarters in Larkspur, Colorado. Le Droit Humain, for its part, established a new American Federation chartered in Delaware.

Over the past decade, American Co-Masonry expanded outside its traditional North American boundaries and today includes Lodges in South America. That expansion made the time right to assume a visibly international identity and resume use of the word “Universal” in place of “American,” Cumsille said.

Photo: Cover of one of the first ritual books used in American Co-Masonry, including the original use of “Universal” as part of the Order’s original name.

Welcome

Welcome

Welcome to the blog.

Look for a new post here at least once a week on topics of interest to Freemasons in general, to Co-Freemasons in particular. This blog is hosted and sponsored by the Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry, the American Federation of Human Rights, so expect lots and lots of news from and about that Order.

It is the intent of this blog to share news, articles and other Masonic information that you won’t necessarily find on other U.S.-based Masonic blogs, websites and news outlets. That need has gone unfulfilled way too long. Rectifying that is the most important thing this blog can do, to broaden the amount of Masonic news and information available to rank-and-file Freemasons, regardless of jurisdiction.

That effort will be brought to a grinding halt if we don’t, right away and right up front, address the topic that just won’t to quit. Currently, the only online topic of discussion about Co-Masonry, at least in the U.S., seems to be about whether it exists (yeah, it has, for well more than a century). There generally follows the ever – forever – tiresome talk about “regularity” and “amity”. Then the word “clandestine” gets tossed into the conversation and what follows usually puts off way more heat than light, especially if no Co-Mason is present to speak truth to ignorance.

I am heartily sick of that topic. I won’t blog about it, unless it somehow becomes news, and any posts about it in the comment section will be deleted. Don’t bring it here and don’t expect me to be moved by any mention of 1st Amendment Rights and etc. This is a private blog, not a public access, and there are plenty of other places online to talk about that worn-thin topic that never goes anywhere.

This blog will do its humble best to go somewhere, to push past that topic and try to move the conversation forward onto other topics.

Make no mistake, there’s a need for that. For instance, most on this side of the pond, Mason and otherwise, don’t know about news in Co-Masonry and female-only Masonry because it isn’t much reported.

For instance, the Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry has darn near tripled in size during the last decade and a new Lodge building is expected to be consecrated later this year.

Oh, and the Order’s name is about to change.

Expect all that in future blog posts.

It isn’t just news about the Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry Masonic that goes unreported. News and information about Freemasonry in Europe seldom falls on our ears. For instance, the Mixed Grand Lodge of France got a new Grand Master last year. In November, Marie-Thérèse Besson, Grand Maîtrese of the of the Feminine Grand Lodge of France gave a lecture in Saint-Gaudin .

Last spring, the Irish Times published an article about the history of women Freemasons and Co-Masons in that country.

Closer to home and earlier this month, there was – in my opinion – an incredibly important and ground-shaking discussion in Philadelphia about the misconceptions between Prince Hall Freemasonry and traditionally African American churches. That event hasn’t been reported much outside of Philadelphia.

Sure, all those events, foreign and domestic, got some attention in the local, nonMasonic press but they warranted not so much as a whisper in the established U.S.-based male-only blogs, websites and news outlets. And there’s no reason why it should. Those sites and outlets prefer to serve only a portion of the Masonic audience. And that’s OK, they have every right to do so.

However, that partial coverage is a very crooked way to navigate through news, articles and information about Freemasonry. It leaves the reader with the inevitable impression that there are only male-only Masons and, therefore, only their news is relevant.

That hasn’t been true for a very long time.

With this blog, I hope to make that crooked way straight. This blog has every right to do that, or to at least try. In any case, the quiet time is over.

Booger.