Universal Co-Masonry’s 2018 Grant Awards

Universal Co-Masonry’s 2018 Grant Awards

In 2018, Universal Co-Masonry received multiple grant awards to assist in the preservation and upkeep of the organization’s headquarters property and campus which is located in Larkspur, Colorado. These awards included grants for forest mitigation work, historic preservation, and greenhouse construction, as well as a shared grant award for disaster preparedness. 

Universal Co-Masonry* received a substantial grant award to improve the forests on the headquarters property in Larkspur, Colorado. Since purchasing the property in 1916, members have labored diligently to improve the local landscape and conserve the natural beauty of the property.

Improving Forest Health

HQ office building

Headquarters Property in Larkspur, Colorado

As part of that effort, the organization applied for conservation grant funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). NRCS’ Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) assists landowners across the United States in the conservation of natural resources such as soil, water, and air. 

In September, the organization was awarded an $186,000 EQIP grant contract for forest stand improvement on the 212 acre property. The EQIP funding will facilitate treatment of the entirety of the forested property, following previous mitigation work completed via grant funding from the Colorado State Forestry Service (CSFS), and is expected to commence in the Spring of 2019.

Protecting the residents, homes, and town of Larkspur from the threat of catastrophic wildfire is of vital importance to Universal Co-Masonry, and the EQIP grant funding will both improve the health of the forest and protect the region against future wildfire risk.

Preserving Historic Structures

Adminstration Building After Construction Completed 1920s

Administration Building after construction completed in 1921

Historic Preservation is another integral priority for Universal Co-Masonry, and the organization’s headquarters campus was added to the National Register of Historic Places in March of 1998. Last year, we applied for grant funding from Colorado’s State Historical Fund (SHF) as part of an effort to protect the headquarter’s Administration Building.

With construction commencing in 1919, this historic structure has weathered substantial wear and tear over the past century, requiring a comprehensive assessment and subsequent renovation to ensure the building’s structural integrity.

In August 2018, we received a grant award of $13,000 from the State Historical Fund for the completion of a Historic Structure Assessment (HSA). Work is currently underway in the first phase of the larger renovation effort to preserve this historic landmark for future generations.

Community Collaboration

Volunteer Day 2017
Local Participants at Forestry Grant Volunteer Day

We are grateful for the grant funding provided by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Colorado State Forestry Service (CSFS), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and Colorado’s State Historical Fund (SHF).

Moreover, the organization appreciates the continued support from our local community partners, including: the Larkspur Fire Protection District (LFPD), Town of Larkspur, Larkspur Historical Society, and Historic Douglas County.

Through collaboration, the shared goals of conservation, wildfire prevention, and historic preservation can be realized for the benefit of all. 


 

* The Order’s corporate entity is the American Federation of Human Rights (AFHR). As such, the grants were applied for and awarded to AFHR. 

**For more information about the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program, visit the EQIP website: www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/programs/financial/eqip/

***For more information about the State Historical Fund’s HSA program, visit:  www.historycolorado.org/historic-structure-assessment-grants

Co-Masonic Order Resumes “Universal” as Part of its Official International Name

Co-Masonic Order Resumes “Universal” as Part of its Official International Name

The Order for decades called “The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry” now is “The Honorable Order of Universal Co-Masonry.” The decision follows a vote by the Order’s Grand Consistory and Lodges, with 95 percent of the Lodges and 100 percent of the Consistory approving the proposition. The vote was ratified by a unanimous vote of the Supreme Council on April 25th, 2017. 

“Universal has a geographical implication of being all over the globe, but also that we allow membership of all races, creeds, religions, sexual orientations, etc.,” Matias Cumsille, President of the Order’s Corporate wing, the American Federation of Human Rights, said in an email.

The corporate name remains the same.

The word “Universal” was part of the Order’s original name during its beginnings in North America, where the first Co-Masonic Lodge on the continent was founded in 1903. The word “Universal” first appears in Co-Masonic history with the founding of “The Order of Universal Co-Freemasonry in Great Britian and the British Dependencies” by Annie Besant in 1902.

That Order operated under the umbrella the French-based “Maçonnerie Mixte”, today know as The International Order of Freemasonry for Men and Women, Le Droit Humain. The North American Order then was Le Droit Humain’s American Federation.

“Universal” likewise became part of the North American Federation’s name and seems to have intermittently continued into the 1940s. An investigation into why the word “Universal” ultimately was replaced turned up no certain answers. North American Co-Masonry remained part of Le Droit Humain until a separation during a protracted and often contentious legal proceeding in the 1990s.

The Order in North America has since operated as an independent Masonic body, “The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry,” operating out of its long-time headquarters in Larkspur, Colorado. Le Droit Humain, for its part, established a new American Federation chartered in Delaware.

Over the past decade, American Co-Masonry expanded outside its traditional North American boundaries and today includes Lodges in South America. That expansion made the time right to assume a visibly international identity and resume use of the word “Universal” in place of “American,” Cumsille said.

Photo: Cover of one of the first ritual books used in American Co-Masonry, including the original use of “Universal” as part of the Order’s original name.

Welcome

Welcome

Welcome to the blog.

Look for a new post here at least once a week on topics of interest to Freemasons in general, to Co-Freemasons in particular. This blog is hosted and sponsored by the Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry, the American Federation of Human Rights, so expect lots and lots of news from and about that Order.

It is the intent of this blog to share news, articles and other Masonic information that you won’t necessarily find on other U.S.-based Masonic blogs, websites and news outlets. That need has gone unfulfilled way too long. Rectifying that is the most important thing this blog can do, to broaden the amount of Masonic news and information available to rank-and-file Freemasons, regardless of jurisdiction.

That effort will be brought to a grinding halt if we don’t, right away and right up front, address the topic that just won’t to quit. Currently, the only online topic of discussion about Co-Masonry, at least in the U.S., seems to be about whether it exists (yeah, it has, for well more than a century). There generally follows the ever – forever – tiresome talk about “regularity” and “amity”. Then the word “clandestine” gets tossed into the conversation and what follows usually puts off way more heat than light, especially if no Co-Mason is present to speak truth to ignorance.

I am heartily sick of that topic. I won’t blog about it, unless it somehow becomes news, and any posts about it in the comment section will be deleted. Don’t bring it here and don’t expect me to be moved by any mention of 1st Amendment Rights and etc. This is a private blog, not a public access, and there are plenty of other places online to talk about that worn-thin topic that never goes anywhere.

This blog will do its humble best to go somewhere, to push past that topic and try to move the conversation forward onto other topics.

Make no mistake, there’s a need for that. For instance, most on this side of the pond, Mason and otherwise, don’t know about news in Co-Masonry and female-only Masonry because it isn’t much reported.

For instance, the Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry has darn near tripled in size during the last decade and a new Lodge building is expected to be consecrated later this year.

Oh, and the Order’s name is about to change.

Expect all that in future blog posts.

It isn’t just news about the Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry Masonic that goes unreported. News and information about Freemasonry in Europe seldom falls on our ears. For instance, the Mixed Grand Lodge of France got a new Grand Master last year. In November, Marie-Thérèse Besson, Grand Maîtrese of the of the Feminine Grand Lodge of France gave a lecture in Saint-Gaudin .

Last spring, the Irish Times published an article about the history of women Freemasons and Co-Masons in that country.

Closer to home and earlier this month, there was – in my opinion – an incredibly important and ground-shaking discussion in Philadelphia about the misconceptions between Prince Hall Freemasonry and traditionally African American churches. That event hasn’t been reported much outside of Philadelphia.

Sure, all those events, foreign and domestic, got some attention in the local, nonMasonic press but they warranted not so much as a whisper in the established U.S.-based male-only blogs, websites and news outlets. And there’s no reason why it should. Those sites and outlets prefer to serve only a portion of the Masonic audience. And that’s OK, they have every right to do so.

However, that partial coverage is a very crooked way to navigate through news, articles and information about Freemasonry. It leaves the reader with the inevitable impression that there are only male-only Masons and, therefore, only their news is relevant.

That hasn’t been true for a very long time.

With this blog, I hope to make that crooked way straight. This blog has every right to do that, or to at least try. In any case, the quiet time is over.

Booger.