Success and the Crafty Freemason

The Crafty Freemason in Durham, a city in northeast England, gets orders from around the world and is thriving as a real shop in a market that now is dominated by online sellers.

“What makes my business stand out from other regalia businesses is that it is local,” said owner and Freemason Susan Blackett. “People can call in and view products before purchase. I can make things bespoke.”

It’s that personal touch that Blackett says makers her business, which had an open day in March, a standout. Located at 41 Quebec Street, Langley Park, in Durham, The Crafty Freemason offers handmade Masonic products, regalia, accessories and hand-crafted items.

Blackett said the business began when she became a Freemason. She was initiated in October of 2013 in Lodge City of Durham No. 105, which labors under the Order of Women Freemasons. “I was passed and raised by April 2014 and this has been very much instrumental in forming my business idea,” Blackett said.

More recently, Blackett has received the Mark, Royal Ark Mariner and ‘Chapter’ Royal Arch, the latter on Feb. 22.

Already a skilled embroiderer and fabric artist, it was natural that the symbols of Freemasonry began to appear in her art, particularly after she became a Master Mason. In April of 2015, she made a cushion bearing the square and compasses for herself and posted photos to a Masonic group active on Facebook. The response was overwhelming, she said.

“I received a multitude of orders and lots of encouragement to develop this into a business,” Blackett recalled. “I attended a small business course and then set myself up as a sole trader making an array of Masonic related hand crafted items.” The Crafty Freemason opened for business that following August.

That was the birth of The Crafty Freemason, which started life in a small room of Blackett’s home. It was not an easy market to break into and regalia sellers aren’t generally succeeding in brick and mortar shops anymore. Toye & Co. had closed its own shop on London’s Great Queen Street, across from Freemasons Hall, in January of that year.

It was her peculiar skill set in art, ease with her clientele and ferreting out merchandise that has helped her succeed in a difficult market, Blackett said. “As my business progressed rapidly, I listened to my customers and it is they who re-defined the structure and purpose of the business through the requests they made, i.e. for ties, gloves, regalia and all manner of Masonic necessities,” she said. “I sourced items, found suppliers who would offer me quality items to retail and my work space advanced to a larger room in my house.”

When her entire house was taken up in the venture, word of The Craft Freemason spread outside the northeast of England and large orders starting coming in from Israel and Kenya, Blackett said she “realized I had to professionalize my business.”

“I likened it to a plant in a pot,” she said. “It can only grow so far in a certain sized pot if you want it to become bigger you have to plant it in a larger pot.”

The larger pot turned out to be the shop in Durham but there may yet be a need for an even larger pot. “I am gradually building up my products in variety and number to cover all Masonic orders although I’m not quite there yet,” Blackett said.

Photo: Susan Blackett with one of her displays at her shop, The Crafty Freemason, in Durham a city in northeast England.

3 Comments on “Success and the Crafty Freemason

  1. Hi Susan ,I purchased an item of you awhile a clock which when I contacted you again you said you said your last one was broke you reimbursed me ,which up to date as not shown on my account ,I sent you two emails regarding this and income I said I take the whiskey glass and maybe a tie set to the amount ,still I have heard nothing ,hoping you can shed some light on this regard carol

    Like

  2. Nice article. Life often takes unexpected turns and opportunities surge for he who has eyes to see.

    Like

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